07
Jun

What makes Designer Workshop different?

“Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful”

William Morris

This is a quote that has resonated with me for a long time. Whilst I would like to think that the sofas and chairs we create are both useful AND beautiful, more than the quote itself, it is the fascinating background to William Morris and what he believed in that really sums up what Designer Workshop is all about.

William Morris is regarded as one of the key figures of the Arts & Craft movement which was a backlash against mass production in the late19th century. This ethos, which placed an emphasis on creating products with integrity and of the craftsman having a connection with the piece being created really does epitomise our approach to upholstery at Designer Workshop.

Morris believed that the division of labour with many people working on a production line making different parts of a product meant that the pleasure from engaging directly with the creative process from beginning to end was lost. Instead, he felt it was important to create beautiful, well made objects that could be used everyday but made in a way that connected people to their product and each other.

When we create a new sofa or reupholster an existing one, the same person does everything from beginning to end. There is no production line where we churn out hundreds of sofas a week. Rather, each time served craftsman takes ownership of the piece he is working on. This is important because at Designer Workshop, we ALL take great pride in the pieces we produce and every job we work on – whether it is a small footstool or an antique sofa requiring extensive restoration – gets the care and attention it deserves. Although sometimes the work can be challenging, it is incredibly rewarding and we get great enjoyment from seeing our creations come to life.

William Morris must have been on to something good – the interiors company he set up in 1861 is still going strong today! Morris & Co produces beautiful wallpapers and fabrics some of which we have used ourselves. If our humble little workshop can come close to emulating his beliefs, I reckon we’ve done alright.

Tan Munir (Co-founder and Owner)

Morris and Co Acanthus velvet used to upholster this stunning antique sofa for Sarah Moore, Interior Designer and TV presenter for BBC’s Money for Nothing


“Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful”

This is a quote that has resonated with me for a long time. Whilst I would like to think that the sofas and chairs we create are both useful AND beautiful, more than the quote itself, it is the fascinating background to William Morris and what he believed in that really sums up what Designer Workshop is all about.

William Morris is regarded as one of the key figures of the Arts & Craft movement which was a backlash against mass production in the late19th century. This ethos, which placed an emphasis on creating products with integrity and of the craftsman having a connection with the piece being created really does epitomise our approach to upholstery at Designer Workshop.

Morris believed that the division of labour with many people working on a production line making different parts of a product meant that the pleasure from engaging directly with the creative process from beginning to end was lost. Instead, he felt it was important to create beautiful, well made objects that could be used everyday but made in a way that connected people to their product and each other.

When we create a new sofa or reupholster an existing one, the same person does everything from beginning to end. There is no production line where we churn out hundreds of sofas a week. Rather, each time served craftsman takes ownership of the piece he is working on. This is important because at Designer Workshop, we ALL take great pride in the pieces we produce and every job we work on – whether it is a small footstool or an antique sofa requiring extensive restoration – gets the care and attention it deserves. Although sometimes the work can be challenging, it is incredibly rewarding and we get great enjoyment from seeing our creations come to life.

William Morris must have been on to something good – the interiors company he set up in 1861 is still going strong today! Morris & Co produces beautiful wallpapers and fabrics some of which we have used ourselves. If our humble little workshop can come close to emulating his beliefs, I reckon we’ve done alright.

Tan Munir (Co-founder and Owner)